The Pretenders: Don't Get Me WrongiTunesAmazon

The Pretenders: Don't Get Me WrongiTunesAmazon

£2.8m investment in Yorkshire cancer treatment

£2.8m investment in Yorkshire cancer treatment

Published at 12:09am 4th February 2016. (Updated at 2:50pm 4th February 2016)

Yorkshire Cancer Research is investing £2.8 million in six new projects aimed at improving the treatment and experience of cancer patients.

The charity has made the announcement on World Cancer Day. 

It recently unveiled an ambitious strategy to save 2,000 lives in Yorkshire every year, by investing £100 million over the next 10 years to tackle cancer inequalities in the region.  

The new funding will support research into priority areas such as lung cancer, early detection and clinical trials, and will involve thousands of people.

The six projects are:  

  • Yorkshire Cancer Research will invest £634,000 in the first clinical trial of a ‘smart-bomb’ drug discovered with funding from the charity at the University of Bradford's Institute of Cancer Therapeutics in 2011. The drug is being progressed into trials by the University’s spin-out company, Incanthera Limited.
  • Experts at the University of Leeds, led by Professor Phil Quirke, will aim to save the lives of up to 150 bowel cancer patients each year, by significantly improving standards of treatment and care in Yorkshire.
  • Researchers at the University of Leeds, led by Professor Galina Velikova and supported by a £200,000 investment, will use an electronic patient reporting system to monitor the experience of lung cancer patients undergoing two different forms of treatment.
  • Researchers at the Hull York Medical School, led by Professor Michael Lind, will investigate whether a mutation found in some lung cancers could be detected using a blood test rather than a biopsy.
  • Yorkshire Cancer Research will invest £106,314 in the development and testing of new tools aimed at encouraging more people to take part in the national screening programme for bowel cancer. 
  • Researchers at the Hull York Medical School, led by Professor Miriam Johnson, will test an enhanced GP system developed to improve access to palliative care for cancer patients in Yorkshire.

Charles Rowett, Chief Executive of Yorkshire Cancer Research, said: "We are delighted to announce another significant investment in projects that will tackle some of the major issues we face in our county.

"Lung cancer is one of Yorkshire’s biggest killers and yet research into this disease is massively underfunded. We will continue to focus on this huge problem during 2016.

"We're also very proud to reveal plans for the first clinical trial of a drug discovered in our region, thanks to funding from our charity and other organisations. The trial will bring this innovative treatment one step closer to reaching cancer patients."