Boroughbridge man to donate his kidney

Boroughbridge man to donate his kidney

Published at 6:41am 11th July 2017. (Updated at 4:18pm 11th July 2017)

Charlie Lockhart, from Skelton-on-Ure, near Boroughbridge, is undergoing keyhole surgery after deciding to donate one of his kidneys.

Charlie's donation comes after his daughter-in-law, Jess, lived for 10 more years after having a kidney transplant.

He also has family members who have suffered kidney failure, and so decided to start the procedure to donate his kidney back in March 2016.

The number of lives being saved by organ donations is on the rise, and more than 900 people are now alive in North Yorkshire thanks to organ donors.

The number of people on the Organ Donor Register has also increased by 27%.

Charlie is an altruistic donor, which means he won't know who he's donating to unless he's contacted by them directly.

He's also on the Organ Donor Register and will donate his organs when he dies.

Charlie is keen to help make a difference to someone else's life.

He said: "I won't know who gets my kidney, it could be a male, female, child, adult. All I do know is that I'm going to give somebody the gift of life, and their families going to be over the moon.

"Most people I speak to have a donor card, to donate any part of their body, so it is on the way up.

"After my death, any organ that's good enough will get donated. I've spoken to the family about this but they're all happy.

"Discomfort for six weeks is something I can live with, when I'm making someone and their family happy, you can't put a figure on that."

NHS Blood and Transplant is now urging people in North Yorkshire to help even more people to survive by joining the Organ Donor Register.

If you sign up, you could save or transform up to nine people's lives by donating your organs when you die and help even more by donating tissue.

Anyone can be a donor, as it doesn't matter how old you are or if you have any medical conditions.

Gordon Crowe, from Yorkshire Donor Care, said: "In the country, we've had over 50,000 people have a life saved through a life-saving transplant.

"We still have about three people a day dying in need of a life-saving transplant, so there are still a number of people unfortunately dying on that transplant waiting list, which is why it is so important to have people join the register.

"What is really important, if people do decide to join the register, is that they tell their loved ones of their decisions and wishes, so that if the relatives are in that awful situation where their loved one has died, it's one less decision for them to make."