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Could your child have ADHD?

Could your child have ADHD?

Published at 3:32pm 10th January 2019.

Evolve Psychology Promoted by
Evolve Psychology

Evolve Psychology has been discussing ADHD, the symptoms and how to deal with the condition on a day-to-day basis.

Around 1.5 million adults and 400,000 children suffer with ADHD in the UK, but a large number of these go undiagnosed formally. We spoke to Evolve Psychology about how to recognise the symptoms, how they can help you get a diagnosis and what actions you can take to deal with the disorder.

What is ADHD?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder involving brain function, affecting the emotion, learning, self-control and memory side of the brain.

ADHD is characterised mainly by problems with paying attention or difficulty controlling behaviour. Although adults can suffer with the disorder, it is usually diagnosed before the age of 12 and is most common in 6-12 year olds.

ADHD is fairly common in the UK, with a recent study showing that around 3.5% of boys and 0.85% of girls between the ages of 5 and 15 were found to have the condition.

Symptoms

Although ADHD is most easily identifiable through a difficulty in paying attention and controlling behaviour, there are more symptoms that affect everyday life for the sufferer:

  • Decreased awareness of circumstances
  • Disorganisation
  • Fidgeting
  • Forgetfulness
  • Frequent talking
  • Hyperactivity
  • Easily distracted
Two children playing

Diagnosis

ADHD is present in the brain from the early developmental years, something that would be apparent when a formal diagnosis is carried out. 

Adults looking to receive a diagnosis for ADHD would need to have shown early signs of the condition throughout their childhood. Although the condition doesn't tend to continue into adulthood and gets better with age, this is dependent on the individual. 

Dealing with ADHD

Although ADHD cannot be cured, symptoms can be managed.

Allergic reactions, too many video games or too long spent in front of the television are among the things associated with the symptons of ADHD, and parents are often criticised. But so-called 'bad parenting' is not a cause of the condition according to Evolve's Dr Laura Powling.

When it comes to dealing with ADHD in children, Evolve Psychology suggest maintaining a positive home environment built on clear and consistent boundaries, expectations and consequences. It is also important to keep these consistent across school, clubs or anyone that regularly interacts with the child to support their condition. 

boy child jumping in puddle

How can Evolve Psychology help?

Every neurological assessment at Evolve Psychology on Victoria Avenue in Harrogate begins with a screening in which the impact of a diagnosis will be discussed. This can involve the child or adult in question, and parents or carers.

The assessment process at Evolve Psychology then takes form in several parts and can include play observation, school/work observation and conversations with teachers/employers, parents and carers.

All assessment methods are recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence, and involves expertise from clinical psychologists, speech and language therapists and psychiatrists.

The team at are recommending local parents or carers who are concerned or interested in an ADHD assessment to get in touch - no pressure, no obligation.

Listen here as Clinical Psychologist Dr Laura Powling from Evolve Psychology discusses ADHD with Stray FM's Pete Egerton:

 

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